Posts Tagged ‘A. Thomas Schomberg’

Buildings in the Movies

February 24, 2011

There was an article in the February 8, 2011 Winfield Courier (Kansas) that stated officials at Southwestern College weren’t pleased that a promotional poster for the thriller Roommate featured one of their buildings. “Our concern is the association — the unauthorized association — of what we think is an iconic image of the college with a ‘slasher’ movie,” said Southwestern College president Dick Merriman in the article. In response to the college, Sony Pictures Entertainment removed the image from the film’s website and from subsequent promotional materials.

Of course, this is far from the first time that an actual building was featured in a movie. What other buildings have been featured in film? Loads of them. I can’t mention them all, but I will mention three buildings that had a “starring” role.

Philadelphia Museum of Art
Actually, it was the East Entrance of the Philadelphia Museum of Art, which was made famous in the 1976 film Rocky, when the title character ran up the steps leading to the said entrance. Since then, thousands of tourists have run up the steps, just like Rocky did in the movies. At the foot of the steps is the Rocky sculpture by A. Thomas Schomberg.  This statue was made for Rocky III in 1980 and after filming was complete, Sylvester Stallone donated it to the city of Philadelphia.

The Dakota (New York City)
One of the most famous apartment buildings in New York City, if not the world, due to its famous inhabitants, such as Lauren Bacall, Leonard Bernstein and John and Yoko Lennon—just to name a few. The building had its exterior featured in two films, the 1968 film Rosemary’s Baby and the 2001 film Vanilla Sky. Interior shots were done on soundstages, since the building’s owner would not permit interior filming to be done.

The Coliseum Ballroom (St. Petersburg, Florida)
Why is this building listed? You ask. It is listed because it was featured in a dance scene in the 1984 film Cocoon. It also is famous for having the largest dance floor in the southeastern United States. How big? Try 13,000 square feet (1,207.73 square meters for those living outside of the U.S.)

So there you have it, three buildings that had a “starring” role. While buildings don’t say much, they aren’t much trouble to the director. After all, a building won’t demand that the director film the “good side” or try to rewrite the script in the building’s favor. It will just stand there, as it always does. If only some actors and actresses were as easy to work with.

Sources:

http://www.winfieldcourier.com/articles/2011/02/08/news/news/doc4d5183cc7aa41324106218.txt

http://www.nyc-architecture.com/UWS/UWS017.htm

http://www.visitphilly.com/museums-attractions/philadelphia/the-rocky-statue-and-the-rocky-steps/

http://www.tampabay.com/blogs/movies/content/after-breakfast-eggs-no-oatmeal-wilfred-brimley-talks-about-cocoon-and-catching-tarpon-st-pe

http://www.stpete.org/coliseum/

Preston, Patricia Tunison & Preston, John. Frommers Tampa & St. Petersburg ’91-’92 Prentice Hall 1991 pg. 148

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